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20130121
20130129
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CSPAN 58
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
. by doing this, we sent a not so subtle signal that the focus of our country is on the farm economy of washington, d.c. instead of that really come out here in charlotte, new orleans, and cheyenne. we as republicans have to accept government number crunching. it is not the answer to our nation's problems. we've got to face one cold hard fact -- washington is a dysfunctional that any budget proposed based on fiscal sanity will be deemed not series by the media and it will fail in the united states senate and will not make it to the president's desk where he would veto it anyway. any serious proposal to restrain government growth is immediately deemed non-serious in washington, d.c. the balanced budget amendment is called non-serious as are term limits, capping federal growth to the growth of the private sector economy is deemed not serious in washington, d.c. anything serious is deemed not serious in washington d.c.. when senator obama voted against raising the debt ceiling, he said he was doing so because the national debt was at an outrageous $8 trillion. he clarified for a fact --
so we can keep interest rates low so we can make sure we don't hurt our economy. >> i want to command -- commend you on the effort of people to just put out a budget. with all due respect on my friends on the other side, last year they were in majority, they chose not to do that. they chose thinking it would provide political cover. it didn't. i think that's what's gone "encore booknotes" the senate side. calculation that somehow this will spare some of our members from difficult votes. i commend you for developing a difficult budget and getting your colleagues to vote on it and it was a legitimate issue in the campaign. i think it's an appropriate place to have the discussion. you come, you vote, we go have a campaign. that helps the country clarify the issues. we move on. the house has fulfilled its responsibility in that regard in through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such t
with zeros on the budget sheet we on the economy of washington, d.c. instead of the real economy. out here in charlotte, in new orleans n sleever port. we have to accept government number crunching, even conservive number crunching is not the answer to our nation's problems. we have to face another cold hard fact. washington is so dysfunctional that it will be deemed not serious by the media. it will fail in the united states senate and wouldn't maket to the president's desk where he would veto it any way. any serious propose toll restrain government decpwroth deemed non-serious in washington, d.c. the balanced budget amendment is called non-serious in washington, d.c. term limits are non-serious in washington, d.c. capping the federal growth also deemed not serious in washington, d.c. the truth is anything serious is deemed not serious in washington, d.c. when then senator obama voted against racing the debt ceiling he said he was doing so because the national debt was at an outrageous $8 trillion. i want to quote the president saying $8 trillion, that's trillion with a t. it is now over
vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might around in their own lives -- might go wrong in their own lives. they want that safety net. it is not an easy sell, but we have to make the case that what you think is security is not. because, as will soon be obvious in states that have followed this model of a larger and larger public sector and more and more benefits, states like california, illinois, new york, they are going to go bankrupt and come to the federal government for a bailout. we have to be ready to hammer home the point that -- what good is it that you voted for security when, now your benefits will not be able to be paid for. it is no longer a public that can afford it. >> this seems like a deeper pot -- deeper cultural problem. how do you convince them that the government is not their husband? a woman has written about how you convince them, when you have this pop-culture suggesting that guys are losers. dads are losers on every comedy show. how do we fix that environment? policy wise, culturally, this is for anybody. >> it is a huge cultural
. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. miller: what this plan does is hold the jobs of american families and working people all across this had country, it holds them hostage. it holds them hostage to the pa
economy and is going to create jobs and increase the standard of living for hard- working, middle-class americans. you know, we talk so much about mortgaging the future, mortgaging our children's future and i care deeply about that. but frankly, we are mortgaging now the future is now. and we all -- all of us here, we want to fight. we want to fight for that nurse, that carpenter, that teacher, that grand parent, that parent, that student, we want to fight for everyone across this country. and the 113th congress has been sent here i think to be do big things, the hard things, and this is the first step in that process. no budget, no pay. >> questions? >> speaker boehner, yesterday in the president's inaugural address he suggested that immigration and climate change will be top priorities for him. what do you think of his call for action on climate change, and is immigration a high priority? >> there are a lot of priorities for the congress. a lot of priorities for the president. and right now, the biggest issue is the debt that's crushing the future of our kids and grandkids. hard
of it, how much the circumstances the economy was unable to brand obama. >> the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a set -- was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the intrusiveness expansion of the pyramid. it was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and there was a referendum about the size and reach of government. and it was a pure ideological election. because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for president. you want boating up and down on a figure. you were voting on issues and the dominant issue was obama and as a scare, the stimulus committee increase in spending, the expansion of the government. or to put it in a more abstract and grand was the difference between federal and state which was tilting more toward state. when the question is put that way, the country shows itself to be center-right country. had republicans been able to duplicate those conditions, that framework in 2012, they would have won. but it is not the same election. 2010 is almost purel
have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. two. the world will not wait for us. global competition for the jobs of tomorrow. leading this next wave of growth entitlement. we must move, swiftly and boldly, to put this recession behind us, and bring forward a unique economic strategy that much." today, i'd like to share my vision of the path ahead. i know that to achieve this vision we must all work together. democrat and republican, house and senate, east and west, to answer the challenges of our age. i have represented both sides of our state, first as a state representative from yakima valley, then in congress representing both eastern and western washington. i want to thank the people of washington for electing me your governor. [applaus
. as much as it is frustrating, so many of us thought, where the economy is right now, with what we are passing on to the next generation, we all see that. talking to one another, you just could not imagine the public would send this guy back to office. for me, that was the hardest part. how do people do that if they really were paying attention and -- to what was going on? the more i talked to people, they stuck with the current guy , it became clear that they don't really know what is going on. whether you want to call it low information voters or what have you, they are not digging in. they have not been personally affected the way they are probably about to be with obamacare and a lot of these things. it is too bad you have to get hit before you realize what is going on. i think there are 10 reasons that we lost. there are probably a lot more. we have to be very careful that we do not try to find, what is that one thing? voter turnout that didn't work. if we just had that computer system working better. maybe that would have made all the difference in ohio. maybe it was the fact
minister is going to put britain after years of uncertainty and take a huge gamble with our economy. he is running scared of ukip, and he cannot deliver for britain. >> i have a polite to say to the right honorable gentleman that his whole argument about there being uncertainty is fatally undermined by the fact that he cannot answer whether he wants a referendum or not. can i give him a little bit of advice? he needs to go away, get a policy, come back and tell us what it is. in the meantime, our approach is what the british people want. it is right for business, it is right for our economy, and we will fight for it. >> and around the world, 170 million children under the age of five are stunted. that means that they are so malnourished that it has affected their physical and possibly their cognitive development. the world has enough food for everyone. as leading non-governmental organizations such as saving the children watch a major campaign, will the prime minister tell us what action the cable taking during its presidency of the g eight? >> my honorable friend is absolutely right to
and taxes even more, whether it is cap and trade, regulating our economy and raising the costs for every american, they are feeling emboldened right now. and if conservatives stand together, we can stop that, and stopping bad things that would harm this country, that would harm americans, is a major victory for the next two years. [applause] but the third thing we can do in the short term is we can use leverage points to plaque real progress on the fiscal and economic crisis threatening this country. the fundamental dynamic when you have divided government is that whichever side owns the default is in the stronger position. either party can stop anything. so whoever wins if nothing gets done, wins the negotiation, wins the battle. it's why on fiscal cliff we got such a lousy deal. because if nothing happened, the result was a massive tax increase on er american who pays taxes, and i think president obama was perfectly fine, he was serene to go off that cliff. why? because his substantive agenda, which he doesn't hide from, is to dramatically expand the size and power of government, and t
that health care is now a huge part of our economy. accounting for almost 30% of gdp. that is to point trillion dollars. -- that is two trillion dollars. i am sure the policy students play a drinking game while watching programs like this on c-span based on how many times the word "unsustainable" is repeated. those same 2011 spending figures released earlier this month revealed that for the third year in a row aggregate spending grew by just 3.9%, the smallest increment in decades. to paraphrase ross perot's running mate in a debate many years ago, "why are we here?" at least one response to that question is we do not know if the health-care cost dragon has been slain or is just hibernating. how much of the slow increase comes from the sluggish economic recovery where people without insurance postpone care over which they don't have any kind of discretion at all, and what about the chronic conditions that continued the development of more sophisticated and expensive treatments and tasks? and for the most expensive health care program there is the fact that 10,000 baby boomers are joini
to note with after almost four years having passed with an economy that's been struggling, the senate never acted. it took one week in which their paychecks were on the line that now the senate is going to step up and do the right thing. we welcome them to this debate around the budget of the nation and look forward to making sure we can begin to reduce the mountain of debt that is facing our children. >> when you go across the country and talk to individuals, they're always stunned. it has been four years since the senate did a budget. when they stood back and looked the last time they did a budget, the ipad wasn't introduced or chevy volt and no instagram. it's shocking. today, you found a bipartisan vote that is asking for accountability and effectiveness in government and that's why we are moving it and we welcome the opportunity that the senate joins the debate and actually brings accountability back. >> today, the house acted. the house acted to put washington on a budget and to force a conversation about how we spend money. everyone in america understands that budgets matter. a
shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decade
to not be part of that, because it is terrible for the economy and seems to be bad politics. host: white house press secretary jay carney. let's hear purcellville in broken arrow, oklahoma, republican. what is your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? caller: i love c-span and i am so glad that you have this live call-in talk show from individuals all over the world. my question is, to the republicans, i know that you heard in the inaugural speech to the word "to gather." we have to come together. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republican
. accordingly, the house stands it's just -- it's terrible for the economy. it seems also to be bad politics. >> can you help me understand specifically what the president wants to pursue in the second term on this? is this something -- does he have legislation that he'd like to see congress passed? are we back to cap and trade? what specifically does he want to do that he didn't do in the first place? >> i think president has longed supported climate change. i think bipartisan opposition to legislative action is still a reality, the president's position remains the same as it was in the first term. he looks forward to building on the achievements made in the first term and he looks at this in a broadway because this isn't deficit reduction, for example, is not a goal onto itself. we pursue it in order to help the economy and help create jobs. otherwise it's not worth the effort, in his mind. >> mike pence delivers his first state of the state address tonight. we'll have that live for you at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. tomorrow, secretary of state hillary clinton testifies on capitol h
regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on smallnd medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large andsml are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that ishy we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. watch any time at c-span.org, where you can find video asked by ministers questions and other are just public affairs programs. >> this event has been phenomenal. we have had more companies with more innovation and more excitement than i can ever recall. chairman just made a huge announcement, -- not only for wi-fi, but other products you cannot eve
of the emergency preparedness or some of the infrastructure in the economy, spoke with a bunch of utility organizations as well as above the gas organizations -- the gas companies out there. they went to have some contracts and place that say they can get utility trucks, let's say from texas, to hookup to a hotel room to keep utility workers. so they can come back and showered during the course of the evening or talk to their family when they are not working 16 hour days. we're kid may actually do from the federal guidelines? it is from having those rules in place but also having the money. having that money trickled down to the local economies. that is where the challenges are. >> i am going to answer two questions. what do we expect, and what do we hope for? what do i expect? i do not really know what to expect. from our friends across the street. i do not really know what to expect. i would hope that they would be leadership that is creative and thinking. it is creative to look to programs like modular housing, energy efficiency, procurement initiatives, etc. it certainly will not avoi
, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] we remember the lessons of our past, years spent in poverty, the parents of a child with a disability had
a huge gamble with our economy. he is running scared. is given into his party and he can't deliver for britain and. i have politely to say to the right honorable gentleman, his whole argument about there being uncertainty is undermined by the fact that he cannot answer whether he wants a referendum or not. can i give him a little bit of advice? he needs to go away, get the policy, come back and tell us what it is. meantime, our approach is what the british people want. it's right for business. it's right for our economy, and we will fight for it in the years ahead. >> mr. caplan barwell. >> mr. speaker, around the world 170 million people, children under the age of five are so malnourished it has affected the physical and possibly their cognitive development. the world has enough feared for it when. we must launch a major paint against malnutrition for children. >> my honorable friend is not so the right to raise this issue, particularly as we share the g8 this year and because some of the leading ngos like save the children have quite rightly launched this campaign today. above al
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
economy stalls. we will have to convince the country to change course. we had to reform entitlements. we had to revisit the healthcare law. clearly president obama does not want us to get that chance. he want his last two years to look just like his first two years of his presidency. it was to perpetuate progressive government for at least a generation. why? he thinks it is the right and to do. to do that, he needs to delegitimize the republican party and house republicans, in particular. he will try to divide us. he will try to get us to fight with each other, question each other so we do not challenge him. if we play into his hands, we will betray the voters who supported us in the country that we serve. we cannot let that happen. we need to be smart. we need to show prudence. what do i mean when i say that? prudence is good judgment in the art of governing. abraham lincoln called it one of the cardinal virtues. it is our greatest obligation as public servants. we have to fund the good in every situation and choose the best means to achieve it. -- find the good in every situation and c
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
nonpartisan testimony that when the debt is this large in comparison to the economy, it costs the country the equivalent of about one million jobs. think about that. if washington got its debt and spending under control, one million more americans will be working today. and if that wasn't sobering enough, fitch ratings recently warned that the failure to come up with a plan for reducing our debt would likely still result in a downgrade of the u.s. credit rating. a lower credit rating is sure to mean higher interest rate. that meansigher credit card rates, higher student loans, certainly higher mortgage payments. despite these warnings, the democrat-controlled senate hasn'troduced a budget in 1,300 days, four years without a budget. how can we begin to get our debt under control when democrats won't even produce a budget this bill is the first step in forcing democrats to put forward a budget so we can start holding washington accountable for its out of control spending. every day, american families have to make decisions abtheir household finances. they have to adjust their spending to co
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
us that the british economy -- businesses far less able to cope with -- >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. as mrs. are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just from europe, but more generally. that is why we should be fighting in europe for more flexible europe and a europe where received regulations come off. the view of the party opposite is to sit back, do nothing, and never listen to the british people or business minds. >> order. >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. western time airs live on c- span2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern, when the house of commons is in session. and again on sunday nights. watch anytime at c-span.org. you can find video of past prime ministers questions and other british public affairs programs. next, president obama, vice president biden, the first lady and jill biden speak to donors before tomorrow's inauguration ceremony. >> a good evening,. thank you so much for joining us tonight. more than that, thank you for the kindness, friendship, and support that you have sho
in america. we are going to pass comprehensive immigration reform. we are going to put this nation's economy on a sustainable path to the future. ladies and gentlemen, it is my great honor to introduce you to a magnificent first lady, michelle obama and the guy she hangs out with, my friend, president barack obama. [applause] hey. [applause] cominght you weren't out! i thought you weren't coming. but you changed your mind. [applause] >> hi, everybody. [applause] excuse our tardiness, but you know what? when stevie wonder has a few words to say to you, you don't rush stevie wonder. pardon our delay. [applause] thank you so much. thank you for that kind introduction. more importantly, thank you for your leadership. [applause] i love joe biden. [applause] i love jill a little bit more. [laughter] but i want to thank you both for making this journey so much more fun. our families have bonded and this has just been a phenomenal four years. i am ready to do four more with both of you. most of all, i want to thank all of you here tonight for everything you have done to bring this inauguration to li
economy, is social justice. not trying to manipulate a society, not trying to move toward a collectivist society. so there are fairly radical -- radically different visions of what creates social justice, what creates that opportunity. i think we as the conservatives, as those who are defenders of freedom, have to constantly be pushing. even when we're running against that brick wall we've got to keep running into it until eventually we knock parts of it down because heaven forbid if this president were to get his vision of the agenda, what would this country look like four years from now? >> talk a little bit more about the tax component of the republican agenda. when you talk about tax reform what does that mean? >> one of the thing that -- things that has some of us enthused, chairman camp, at least this is what i'm hear they spent two years holding hearings, collecting information about what a much broader base, lower rate, a lot less, you know, sorry to throw some acquaintances under the bus, lobbyist created carveouts, special extenders in the tax code would look leek and why do we
on the economy. on the economy. his speech was supposed to be uplifting. republicans feel like for them to help steer the economy in the right direction, you have to get bending under control. with democrats, when they want to push jobs, it involves more stimulus spending. the two sides clash. they have never been able to pass some bills because it included stimulus that democrats wanted to pass. republicans want to get the economy going in the right direction and reduced spending. reduced federal regulations. repeal parts of obamacare. this is what job creation is about. that is part of the reason why congress is not passed these measures is because the two sides have opposite views on what it would take to create new jobs in america. that will continue. caller: i am calling in about the abortion and gay -- ia am fr contraceptives and they read killed -- date rape pills. as far as what it says in the bible, yes, it is against it. it says judge not lest you be judged. as far as the gay people go, i do not know anybody gay but i am for the rights of the gays because there are so many out there.
and a stable economy as a means to security and stability. i think the concerns are many. the concerns are around africa com in 2008 at a time when africa surpassed the middle east in its supply of oil to the united states and the concern of the u.s. of africa and oil and a vital resource is the true rationale for africacom, as well as countering china in that theater where china is increasing its influence. the concern was heightened before africacom was heightened. concern has grown over time. is there any effort to evaluate africacom? i understand your stepping down as a new commander steps in. there has been a congressional hearing on benghazi, but clearly there is a bigger issue at stake and that is u.s. foreign-policy with regards to africa. thank you. >> thank you. it will not surprise you that i disagree with most of what you said, which is ok here k. we live in a country where you can do that. it is true that the state department has the authority for security assistance matters. some of that 8-9,000,000,000 dollars that is spent in africa does in fact go to security assistanc
was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were voting on issues. and the don't instant -- dominant issue was obama, was the increase in spending, was essentially the expansion of government. or to put it a more abstract and grand way, the relationship between citizen and state which obviously was tilting towards state. so -- and there when the question is
country, tammy duckworth, the economy, and every other issue. to be very specific, because of a family's list and some of you in this room, he will celebrate the 20th anniversary of family and medical leave. he enacted into law. [applause] >> than a two-year anniversary of lilly ledbetter legislation. forward if women are in the congress and committee. we will have to deal with issues like the safety of our children. thank you for making this a part of your agenda. you will have to be dealing with the issue that relates to violence against women. we need to pass that legislation. we have to deal with jobs. i want to say a personal thanks. if we did not have some many women in the congress we never would have the first woman speaker of the house. you haven't seen that the net. having strength and numbers for women leading the way are helping to change the playing field. i promise you this. it increases the level of civility in politics. we will change the environment in which politics is being conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our c
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
, i'm not sure that this is just some weakening of the military system. the economy is on the brink. now we may be going to this different type of military. i am not sure if there is an underlying purpose for this. i do not think -- they do great, there are great roles for women in the military, but i do not think this will work. host: thank you for the call. on our facebook page -- from our twitter page, there is this -- one more call on this topic, and then we will turn our attention to the senate yesterday -- dorothy from baltimore, good morning. caller: i am glad i am a woman on your expressing my views. women should not be in infantry. absolutely not. host: why? caller: we are not built for that. men and women action not be in close contact like that. it will not work. it simply will not work. it is in our nature. manpower -- men are attracted to women. that is a fact that cannot be in -- ignored. we're not physically build to do that. we can do things, i am not trying to down women. we are not meant. -=- -- men. host: the pentagon of lifting the ban on women to serve on the fr
will come back to that. the administration walked in. we were in the middle of a collapse of our economy. a lot of this is working in two. democrats and republicans dispute who is responsible for the dead. >> wait a minute. i cannot let you buy with that. it is true. i do not know how much longer you will say he inherited this. that might have worked for a year but now we're in the fifth year. everyone knows better but they keep saying it. the money i am talking about was in the present budget. i am talking about the first budget. all the cuts that are there to the military, it is the incredible spending increases. the amount of deficit that had given us in his own budget is more than all president in the history of this country going back to george washington combined. nobody seems to care. we have a job to do. the number one job, i often say that may be true but i'm a big spender in two area. defense and infrastructure. that is what we're supposed to be doing. >> will congress be able to delay? >> jummy the delays we are looking at are even -- to me the delays we are looking at are eve
it will be on the really important issues to the american public like how do we create jobs, get the economy running again? very importantly, how rain in the long-term debt? that would require a lot of concessions by democrats on entitlement programs. i think the president coming off of the fiscal cliff debate, the republicans, that was their golden moment to extract concessions from the democrats, specifically on social security. i think he would agree with me the end of the negotiations, the trade between the republicans and democrats was to do an increase in the debt ceiling, in exchange for cutbacks in so security cost-of-living adjustments. john boehner and republicans decided they want to have an argument over the debt ceiling, because of the new year we will be better positioned. they quickly have realized that is not going to be the lever they thought it would be. host: you have covered three presidents, clinton, bush, and now president obama. people say the political divide between these branches is stronger now than it has been in years. you agree or disagree? guest: i absolutely agree. host: wh
% of the entire budget of government at a time that the world is getting smaller, that our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market than anytime in our history. so not just in my briefings at the state department but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, to refugee camps and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work that our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interests. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman and mr. ranking member, not just because it will be my responsibility but because i will not be able to do this job effectively nor will our country get what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman, and members of the c
and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and ene
to correct this injustice. and in this tough economy now more than ever before women are the last line of economic defense for themselves and their children, working to keep a roof over their family's head and food on the table. that is why we need the paycheck fairness act without delay. it is time for the congress to act and give women a fighting chance to receive fair pay for their hard work. it's time to get this legislation to the president's desk. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back her time. the house will be in order. please take conversations outside of the chambers. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana rise? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize national school choice week, which has grown from 200 organizations and 150 events in 2011, to 500 organizations in more than 3,500 events this year. national school choice week highlights the benefits of school choice
, the economy, healthcare, reducing the deficit, or addressing climate change. he is respected by leaders of the government, and if you add it all up, i think he is spent most of the last four years leading interagency meetings, hearing people out, listening to them, forging consensus, and making sure policies are implemented and everybody is held accountable. he always holds himself accountable first and foremost. it is no easy task, but through it all denis mcdonough does it with class, integrity and thoughtfulness for other people's point of views. he is the consummate public servant, he plays it straight and that is the kind of teamwork that i want in the white house. time and again i have relied on dennis to help in the outreach to our immigrant and faith communities. he understands that in the end our policies and programs are measured in the concrete differences that they make in the lives of fellow human beings and the values that we advance as americans. he insists on knowing for himself the real world impact of the decisions that we make, so away from the cameras without fanfare
and not a source of strength for the economy and they do a better job of lending. there could be things they have done differently and it would have been nice if there was openness. >> let me back into this. >> how big a company is this? >> $1.2 trillion. they have -- >> and the former treasury secretary under clinton. you say he brought tim geithner he new treasury, out of tne ne york fed. you write, 'tim played a staff role, and had been the mechanic of the bailout programs. hank and ben treated him like staff. he had been elevated for all the wrong reasons and had every expectation tim would continue his citigroup friendly policy." did he continue the citigroup friendly policy and did they make out better with him as secretary? >> there is no question. the government was quite generous. just about every mistake in the book -- >> bob rubin was worth millions and never punished in any way. >> i don't get it. he shows up in conferences and in -- i can tell he never real ly accepted responsibility for any of this. he helped create the beast and he was secretary of the treasury and to go become the
, of course the economy. but how does all of that fit? how does that come into something that is coherent? as a vision for the next four years and as a strategy of getting those things achieved. i think that will be great to hear. and to be reflective. what have we learned in the last four years? he came in with high expectations, and he can address some of the divisions that existed in the country politically. he can address domestic and foreign policy issues that were affecting the country. what has he learned about what it takes now and what he will have to do and what his administration will have to do, and what is counting on the american people to do to make his agenda come to fruition? host: the president and vice- president are currently at service at st. john's episcopal old church, just run the corner of the white house. their it is on your screen. we will watch them as they go out. approximately 45 minutes -- 15 minutes more in the service before the exit the church. jane in jacksonville, florida, a democrat's line. please go ahead. caller: first of all, good morning. i want to
ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together. together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play. together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortune. through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiative and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constants in our character. but we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. for the american people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than american sol
the administration walked in and we were in the middle of a collapse of our economy. so a lot of this was sort of walking into. obviously democrats and republicans dispute ho is responsible for the debt today. but the fact is -- >> i can't let you by with that because that's not true. i don't know how much longer you are going to say you inherited this. that might have worked for the first you're but we're in the fifth year. the money that i'm talking about was in the president's budget. i'm talking about the first budget. i was in afghanistan when that came through and every since then all the cuts to the military. but the incredible spending increases. the amount of deficit that he has given us in his own budget is more than all presidents in the history of this country going back to george washington come bind. nobody seems to care. he is the charmer. but we have a job to do. i often say they will declare me as the most conservative member. i'm a big spend ner two areas, one is defense and the other is infrastructure. i think that's what we're supposed to be doing but that's not what the pr
economy gave us an actual surplus of funding. sense that there is at the white house a feeling, two things that i would like to disabuse the white house of. thfirst is tt the budget problem isn't a real problem. i can't believe that people at the white house think that. i mean, everybody knows it is. senator mcconnell gave a very good explanation of what was going -- what was going on there, but let me say it this way -- in 2025, according to the congressional budget office, every dollar of taxes we collect will go to pay for medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt, and there is nothing left for national defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program w
going to do for them and the economy and securing their streets and securing their place in the world. that shows in the exit polls, hispanic voters are not single-issue voters. as a republican party we can probably do better by being more welcoming in our rhetoric at times and there is a lot of policies that recognize that we are, not just a nation of immigrants, but a nation of laws. expediting illegal immigration. i have an interpreder the from afghanistan who tries to get a visa but he fails to get a visa because there is not enough visas. he could come here easily lylely but he wants to do the right thing to be a productive citizen. same thing with immigrants that are already here. if they are high-skilled workers or if they are low-skilled migrant workers. we can have policies that have them stay here and not have concerned about returning them to their home country once their visa is up. the problem with comprehensive immigration, the 1986 bill that did pass, you often times get the amnesty without the enforcement because other groups sue and block it. >> not to get into too ma
believe we have to both walk and chew gum at the same time. we have to deal with our own economy and our fiscal situation. that is a given. that is the source of our strength and capacity. we also have to be smart about making the right investments in diplomacy and development to try to solve problems and prevent them. i have outlined what should be a no brainer. let us have the permission to take money we already have. and then let's look at the budget as we move forward. sequestration will very damaging to the state department and usaid if it does come to pass. it throws the baby out with the bath. are there programs we could reduce, make more efficient, yes, that's part of what i have been trying to do. but there are also a lot of incentive programs to security ,- important, various programs like security of our personnel in dangerous places that we cannot afford to cut more of. i hope we have a sensible discussion but it going for -- budget discussion going forward. >> madam secretary, thank you figure commitment to this country -- for your commitment to this country. i have seen th
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